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Should You Keep Your Child Home From School?

Chicken Pox
Should you keep your child home from school?
Yes. Children with uncomplicated chicken pox may return on the sixth day after the onset of the rash or when the spots are all dried and crusted, whichever is longer.

Cold, with mild symptoms such as stuffy nose with clear drainage, sneezing, mild cough
Should you keep your child home from school?
No. Your child may attend school if he or she is able to participate in school activities.

Conjunctivitis (pink eye)
Should you keep your child home from school?
Yes. Students may return 24 hours after treatment is started.

Cough
Should you keep your child home from school?
Yes. Keep your child home if the cough is persistent and productive coupled with thick or constant nasal drainage.

Diarrhea
Should you keep your child home from school?
Yes. Students should be kept home for 24 hours after the last episode of diarrhea without the use of any medicine.

Fever
Should you keep your child home from school?
Yes. Students should stay home if their temperature is 100 degrees or more. Keep students home until fever-free for 24 hours without the use of fever-controlling medicine.

Fifth Disease
Should you keep your child home from school?
No. By the time the rash appears, children are no longer contagious and do not need to stay home.

Head Lice
Should you keep your child home from school?
Yes. Students may return after their hair has been treated and they are nit free.

Impetigo
Should you keep your child home from school?
Yes. Students may return to school 24 hours after treatment starts. Sores should be covered when students returns to school.

Mumps
Yes. Students with mumps should stay home from school for a total of five days after the symptoms begin.

Poison Ivy
Should you keep your child home from school?
No. Poison ivy is not contagious, so students do not need to stay home. Open lesions should be covered when students come to school.

Ringworm
Should you keep your child home from school?
No. Students may come to school as long as the area is being treated and that it remains covered when the student is at school. Proof of treatment must be brought to school.

Strep Throat
Should you keep your child home from school?
Yes. Students may return to school 24 hours after treatment has started and when fever is no longer present.

Vomiting
Should you keep your child home from school?
Yes. Students should be kept home for 24 hours after the last episode of vomiting without the use of any medicine.

For the protection of the other students and employees, your child will be sent home if any of these symptoms, conditions, illnesses are found or suspected during the school day. Please make sure your child’s school has current phone numbers for you.
 

Immunization Information

The Director’s Journal Entry that details the immunizations required for school enrollment in Ohio has been revised to more closely reflect recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). These changes for the 2010-2011 school year include:

1. The requirement of a second dose of Varicella for entering kindergarteners.

2. The requirement that a dose of polio be administered on or after the 4th

birthday for entering kindergarteners.

3. The requirement of a Td/Tdap dose for entering 7th graders.

These requirements are all progressive, meaning after the 2011-2012 school year, all entering kindergartners and all 1st graders (whether retained, transferred or newly entering) will need to meet the first and second requirements, and 7th and 8th graders will need to meet the third requirement.

VARICELLA

This requirement assures that all children entering kindergarten have a second dose of

varicella. The first dose of varicella vaccine must be administered on or after the 1st birthday and must be given at same time or at least 28 days after receiving other live virus vaccines such as MMR.

POLIO

This requirement assures that the the final dose of polio vaccine is administered on or after the child’s 4th birthday, regardless of the number of previous doses. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines, indicate that at least three doses of polio are needed if all IPV is used and, the last dose must be given on or after age 4. Most children will receive four doses due to combination vaccines.

Examples:

1. Child presents with no doses of IPV: child needs at least three doses for kindergarten entry; the last dose must be after age 4, and the minimum vaccine schedule should be:  now, 4 weeks, 6 months.

2. Child presents with 1 dose of IPV: child needs at least two doses for kindergarten entry; the last dose must be after age 4, and the vaccine spacing should be: now, 6 months.

3. Child presents with 2 doses of IPV; child needs at least one dose for kindergarten entry; the last dose must be after age 4, and the 3rd dose should be 6 months from the 2nd.

4. Child presents with 3 doses of IPV: if the 3rd dose was given prior to age 4, then one additional dose is required. The 4th dose should be given at least 6 months from the 3rd dose. If the 3rd dose was after age 4, then the child meets the minimum requirement for entry. No further doses are required for entry into kindergarten.

5. Child presents with 4 doses of IPV; if the 4th dose was given prior to age 4, then a 5th dose is required for entry. If the 4th dose was given after age 4, then the child meets the requirement for entry and no further doses are required.

6. Child presents with 5 doses of IPV; if the 5th dose was given prior to age 4, then a final dose is required for school entry. If the 5th dose was given after age 4, then the child meets the requirement for entry and no further doses are required.